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OverviewEdit

A list of national leaders, Ministers and UN officials who were ousted or impeached between 2014 and 2018 after claimed corruption, defrauding the state or professional gross misconduct!

Politicians' personal political bias, electoral fraud and those running puppet states are not included in this list.

The accusedEdit

Park Geun-hyeEdit

Park Geun-hye (Hangul: 박근혜; Hanja: 朴槿惠; RR: Bak Geun(-)hye; IPA: [pak‿k͈ɯn.hje]; English: /ˈpɑːk ˌɡʊn ˈheɪ/;[1] born 2 February 1952) is a former South Korean politician who served as President of South Korea from 2013 to 2017.

Park — the first woman to be elected as President of South Korea[2] — was also the first female president popularly elected as head of state in East Asia.

Prior to her presidency, Park was chairwoman of the conservative Grand National Party (GNP), which later changed its name to Saenuri Party in February 2012, from 2004 to 2006 and 2011 to 2012. She was also a member of the National Assembly, serving four consecutive parliamentary terms between 1998 and 2012. She started her fifth term as a representative elected by national list in June 2012. Her father, Park Chung-hee, was the President of South Korea from 1963 to 1979, serving five consecutive terms after he seized power in 1961.[2]

In 2013 and 2014, Park was ranked 11th on the Forbes list of the world's 100 most powerful women and the most powerful woman in East Asia.[3] In 2014, she was ranked 46th on the Forbes list of the world's most powerful people, the third-highest South Korean on the list, after Lee Kun-hee and Lee Jae-yong.

On 9 December 2016, Park was impeached by the National Assembly on charges related to influence peddling by her top aide, Choi Soon-sil.[4] Her presidential powers and duties were suspended with the ratification of the impeachment. Then-Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn thus assumed those powers and duties as Acting President.[5] The impeachment was upheld by the Constitutional Court via a unanimous 8–0 ruling to remove Park from office on 10 March 2017, discontinuing her presidency and forcing her out of office.[6]

She was impeached in relation with the 2016 South Korean political scandal.

In late October 2016, investigations into Park's relationship with Choi Soon-sil, daughter of the late Church of Eternal Life cult leader and President Park's mentor Choi Tae-min began.

Choi and President Park's senior staffs including both Ahn Jong-bum and Jeong Ho-sung have used their influence to extort ₩77.4 billion (~ $75M) from Korean chaebols – family-owned large business conglomerates – and set up two culture and sports-related foundations, Mir and K-sports foundations. Choi is also accused of having influenced Ewha Womens University to change their admission criteria in order for her daughter Chung Yoo-ra to be given a place there. The head of Samsung Corp., Lee Jae Yong, was brought down over it.

Ahn Jong-bum and Jeong Ho-sung, top presidential aides, were arrested for abuse of power and helping Choi; they denied wrongdoing and claimed that they were simply following President Park's orders.

Park is currently an inmate at Seoul Detention Center.

Yingluck ShinawatraEdit

Yingluck Shinawatra (Thai: ยิ่งลักษณ์ ชินวัตร, rtgs: Yinglak Chinnawat, pronounced [jîŋ.lák tɕʰīn.nā.wát]; born 21 June 1967), nicknamed Pu (Thai: ปู, pronounced [pūː], meaning "crab"),[1] is a Thai businesswoman and politician, she is a member of the Pheu Thai Party who became the 28th Prime Minister of Thailand following the 2011 election. Yingluck was Thailand's first female Prime Minister and its youngest in over 60 years. Also, she holds the distinction as the world's first female of Chinese descent to had led the government of a UN member state. She was removed from office on 7 May 2014 by a Constitutional Court decision that found her guilty on a charge of abuse of power.[2][3] On 27th September 2017, she is sentenced in absentia to five years in prison because of her criminal negligence in a rice subsidy scheme program towards rice producers.

The Supreme Court convicted her of mishandling a rice subsidy scheme which allegedly cost Thailand at least $8bn and left the international export market open to Vietnamese firms who cornered the market at Thailand's expense. She reckoned the poor deserve cheep rice and exporting all of it was cruel, but most stayed in warehouses and went nowhere according to state officials. Some critics said she did not really care about poverty and just wanted to buy northern peasants' votes with cheep rice.

Born in Chiang Mai Province into a wealthy family of Hakka Chinese descent,[4][5] Yingluck Shinawatra earned a bachelor's degree from Chiang Mai University and a master's degree from Kentucky State University, both in public administration.[6] She then became an executive in the businesses founded by her elder brother, Thaksin Shinawatra, and later became the president of property developer SC Asset and managing director of Advanced Info Service. Thaksin served as Prime Minister from 2001 until 2006 when he was overthrown by a military coup. He fled abroad shortly before he was convicted in absentia of using his position to increase his own wealth. He has since lived in self-imposed exile to avoid his sentence in prison.

In May 2011, the Pheu Thai Party, which maintains close ties to Thaksin, nominated Yingluck as their candidate for Prime Minister in the 2011 election.[7][8] She campaigned on a platform of national reconciliation, poverty eradication, and corporate income tax reduction and won a landslide victory.

After mass protests against her government in late 2013, she asked for a dissolution of parliament on 9 December 2013, triggering a snap election, but continued to act as caretaker prime minister.[9] On 7 May 2014, the Constitutional Court of Thailand removed Yingluck Shinawatra from the office of caretaker prime minister and defence minister following months of political crisis. The court found her guilty of charges of abuse of power over the transfer of national security chief Thawil Pliensri in 2011 to make way for a Pheu Thai supporter.[10] In the wake of the May 2014 military coup, Yingluck was arrested along with former cabinet ministers and political leaders of all parties and held at an army camp for a few days while the coup was consolidated.

As chairperson of the rice committee, Yingluck faced investigation by Thailand's anti-graft agency which investigated Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's role in the rice pledging scheme after bringing formal charges of corruption against two of her cabinet ministers. The National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) checked to see if she was negligent in her duties as chair of the National Rice Policy Committee.[69] Representatives from The United States were present.

Despite being chairperson of the rice committee, Yingluck admitted in the 2013 censure debate against her government that she had never attended meetings of the National Rice Policy Committee.[70]

On 7 May 2014, the Constitutional Court unanimously dismissed Yingluck from office in consequence of the unconstitutional transfer of a top security officer, Thawil Pliensri, as National Security Council secretary-general in 2011. Thawil was removed from the post in September 2011, paving the way for then police chief Pol Gen Wichean to replace him. Pol Gen Priewpan Damapong, the brother of the former wife of Yingluck's brother Thaksin, succeeded Pol Gen Wichean as police chief. Yingluck argued that Pol Gen Priewpan's appointment was not for the sake of her family because Thaksin had already divorced Potjaman Damapong when the transfer was made.[71]

On 8 May 2014, the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) unanimously agreed to indict Yingluck in the rice-pledging scheme corruption case citing millions of rice farmers who remain unpaid.[72][73][74]

On 28 November, Thailand's National Legislative Assembly (NLA) denied the addition of 72 pieces of evidence to her rice-pledging case. The first hearing of her impeachment case was also scheduled to be on 9 January 2015.[75]

On 15 January 2016, the trial against Yingluck began.[76]

On 25 August 2017, the day the judgment was scheduled to be pronounced by the Supreme Court, Yingluck failed to appear before the court, who then issued an arrest warrant for her and confiscated her ฿30,000,000 bail money.[77] Police estimated up to 3,000 of her supporters gathered outside the court in Bangkok before the hearing of the judgment. It was reported that Yingluck had fled the country ahead of the judgment.[78] Some senior members of her political party said she left Thailand the week before to Dubai.[79] The pronouncement was then rescheduled to 27 September 2017. If convicted, Yingluck could be jailed up to 10 years and permanently banned from politics.[78]

On 27 September 2017, the judgment was pronounced in her absence, saying she was found guilty of dereliction of duty over the rice subsidy scheme and was sentenced to five years in prison.[80][81]

Dilma RousseffEdit

Dilma Vana Rousseff (Brazilian Portuguese: [ˈdʒiwmɐ ˈvɐnɐ ʁuˈsɛf(i)]; known mononymously as Dilma, born 14 December 1947) is a Brazilian economist and politician who was the 36th President of Brazil from 2011 until her impeachment and removal from office on 31 August 2016, becoming the first democratically-elected female president in the world to be impeached and removed. She was the first woman to hold the Brazilian presidency and had previously served as Chief of Staff to former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva from 2005 to 2010.

The daughter of a Bulgarian immigrant, Rousseff was raised in an upper middle class household in Belo Horizonte.[2] She became a socialist in her youth and after the 1964 coup d'état joined left-wing and Marxist urban guerrilla groups that fought against the military dictatorship. Rousseff was captured, tortured, and jailed from 1970 to 1972.

After her release, Rousseff rebuilt her life in Porto Alegre with Carlos Araújo, who was her husband for 30 years.[2] They both helped to found the Democratic Labour Party (PDT) in Rio Grande do Sul, and participated in several of the party's electoral campaigns. She became the treasury secretary of Porto Alegre under Alceu Collares, and later Secretary of Energy of Rio Grande do Sul under both Collares and Olívio Dutra. In 2000, after an internal dispute in the Dutra cabinet, she left the PDT and joined the Workers' Party (PT).

In 2002, Rousseff became an energy policy advisor to presidential candidate Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who on winning the election invited her to become his minister of energy. Chief of Staff José Dirceu resigned in 2005 in a political crisis triggered by the Mensalão corruption scandal. Rousseff became chief of staff and remained in that post until 31 March 2010, when she stepped down to run for president. She was elected in a run-off on 31 October 2010, beating Brazilian Social Democracy Party (PSDB) candidate José Serra. On 26 October 2014 she won a narrow second-round victory over Aécio Neves, also of the PSDB.

Impeachment proceedings against Rousseff began in the Chamber of Deputies on 3 December 2015. On 12 May 2016, the Senate of Brazil suspended President Rousseff's powers and duties for up to six months or until the Senate decided whether to remove her from office or to acquit her. Vice President Michel Temer assumed her powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during her suspension. On 31 August 2016, the Senate voted 61–20 to impeach, finding Rousseff guilty of breaking budgetary laws and removing her from office.

In March and April 2015 millions of protesters took to the streets during the 2015 protests in Brazil against Rousseff's alleged involvement in the Petrobras scandal which involved kickbacks and corruption. When allegations surfaced that graft occurred while President Rousseff was part of the board of directors of Petrobras, between 2003 and 2010, Brazilians became upset with the government and called for Rousseff's impeachment. No direct evidence implicating Rousseff in the scheme has been made public, and she denies having any prior knowledge of it. 

Tomomi InadaEdit

Tomomi Inada (稲田 朋美 Inada Tomomi, born 20 February 1959) is a Japanese lawyer and politician. Inada resigned as defense minister in July 2017 over a cover up scandal. She spent time as the Chairwoman of the Policy Research Council of the Liberal Democratic Party in her fourth term as a member of the House of Representatives in the Diet (national legislature). She is a native of Fukui Prefecture.

Inada resigned in late July 2017 over claims that she helped to cover up internal records that exposed the danger Japanese peacekeepers faced in South Sudan after the Defense Ministry partially released information it had found on a computer.

The primary task of Japan’s 350-strong military contingent, which was based in Juba for the past between 2012 and 2017, was been to build infrastructure in the war-torn country. She , who rejected opposition calls to resign because she refused to describe the conflict as “fighting.” in a private e-mail that was leaked. She was later sacked from her job due to unpopularity and a lack of penitence for her bad attitude in the ministry.

The withdrawal helped ease the political pressure on Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, which had sworn to resign if any Japanese troops were killed in the mission. His support amongst key voters was badly eroded after his wife was linked to a school accused of involvement in a murky land deal in early 2017.

Renata Lok-DessallienEdit

The United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative in Myanmar since January, 2014, Renata Lok-Dessallien, was informally investigated by the UN and unofficially asked to quit during September, 2017; due to accusations she helped the Myanmar government cover-up a massacre of Rohingya people by non-Rohingyas in Maungdaw township earlier that year. The UN soon denied she was sacked or even asked to be sacked after rumours that she was removed from her job in the September of 2017.

Viktor YanukovychEdit

Viktor Yanukovych

Others that may fallEdit

  1. Jacob Zuma
  2. Michel Temmire
  3. Nicolas Maduro
  4. Nawaz Sharif
  5. Benjamin Netanyahu

Also seeEdit

  1. The cancer of corruption
  2. President
  3. Prime Minister
  4. 2017 Kenyan false diplomas for state officials scam

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